Today we launch the Acclaro Energy Programme, and with it comes a series of free guidance that opens up the world of energy management and policy. Today we begin with a jargon busting look at UK energy and carbon compliance.

The energy and carbon industry is so full of reporting acronyms, that sometimes it’s hard to keep up.  July (2018) brought yet another to the doors of the UK corporate world; SECR – Streamlined Energy Carbon Reporting. For the many businesses currently navigating the energy and carbon regulatory regimes, adding another to the mix should not be too difficult to handle. In many instances, reporting requirements utilise the same energy data in a variety of ways to translate into business energy and carbon. But, as new regulations are added, the harder the names roll off the tongue.

Let’s talk a bit about what currently exists.

CCL
Climate Change Levy is first of the two energy taxes targeted towards energy-intensive organisations. Introduced in 2001, the tax is applied to electricity and gas bills for all businesses and public sector organisations that pay the standard rate of VAT. Exempt from CCL are businesses using less than 1,000kWh electricity and less than 4,397kWh gas, per month. No reporting is required by business energy users. CCL seems to be here for the long haul.

MGHG
Mandatory greenhouse gas reporting (MGHG reporting), introduced in 2013, requires all UK quoted companies to publicly report their greenhouse gas emissions on all forms of energy used annually. At present this policy only affects around 1200 companies. The main focus is on transparency of carbon data for carbon management and reduction.

CRC
The Carbon Reduction Commitment Energy Efficiency Scheme, this one doesn’t exactly roll of the tongue, but luckily it is also known as the CRC scheme. CRC is second of the two energy taxes targeted towards large energy-intensive organisations. This tax and reporting mechanism, introduced in 2016, is levied to encourage eligible businesses and public sector organisations to consume energy more efficiently. Over 5000 undertakings report annually to the Environment Agency. The reports cover UK energy use and the purchase of allowances to cover their carbon emissions. The scheme phases cover emissions generated over UK financial year; March 2019 will mark the last phase – the end of the CRC scheme.

ESOS
Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme (ESOS) introduced in 2014; another which seems to be here to stay, is a mandatory reporting regulation that requires non-SME undertakings to audit their energy use. The key word in this scheme is opportunity; the aim is to identify opportunity to save energy and potentially cut related energy costs. However, whilst this scheme requires an element of reporting, the minimal nature of the reporting does not include public disclosure. In fact, unless formally audited, the compliance reports are not reviewed by the regulator, Environment Agency.

SECR
Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting framework, as the name suggests is aimed to simplify and bring together elements of the above reporting schemes into one clean process. This framework will be in play from April 2019 with a wider compliance qualification. Similar to MGHG reporting, it will be implemented through disclosure in annual directors reports with Companies House. SECR will replace CRC reporting, with a combination of MGHG and ESOS reporting elements. These changes will add value to robust reporting mechanisms and the opportunity to quantify ESOS outputs with energy efficiency action and carbon management into one streamlined approach.  It is estimated that the number of companies which will be required to comply with SECR will change from the 1,200 covered in MGHG to 11,900. This includes all quoted and large unquoted companies with some exceptions. In other words, many companies complying with ESOS will be scooped up into the SECR framework.

Our team of energy and sustainability experts have extensive experience in navigating the policy landscape and delivering reporting that meets regulatory requirements and business objectives. To find out more about the above reporting mechanisms and how they may affect your business, please get in touch.

The Acclaro Energy Programme helps organisations to adapt for and address the very visible responsibilities that sit within energy efficiency. We’d be happy to assist you in taking action whether mandatory or voluntary to manage risk, reduce cost or enhance business reputation.